Self-Management is a Practice

Self-management starts with self-awareness. Understanding the state of our body and what energy we bring to a situation helps us to know what we need to manage. Learn more about the first SEL competency of self-awareness in our recent posts.

In this video, Teri Wood, Ph.D., Trust Based Relational Intervention and Brain Development Coordinator for Austin ISD, dives into the importance of self-management in our everyday relationships and tools to help us regulate and manage our energies.

Self-Management in Austin ISD

According to our 2018-2019 student climate survey, data shows that 88% of our students are aware when their feelings change, and 77% of those same students are able to use tools & practices to calm themselves down. These are great self-management results for our student population. Of course, there’s always room for growth, but that goes for people of any age!

As adults and educators, we need to remember that the energy we bring into schools and classrooms impacts the students with whom we interact. Here are a few simple steps to help you manage your energy like a boss:

  • Take a moment to slow down and notice your feelings.
  • Use the tools and practices you need in order to regulate your bodies. This can range from a walk and talk, stretching, breathing techniques, or using a fidget to get your body centered and your mind back to the present moment.
  • Be open and honest with those around you. Let others know when you’re feeling anxious or low energy, etc. This is especially important in the classroom, because students will notice.
  • Don’t forget to practice self-compassion through the process.

Self management is a work in progress because we, as humans, are a work in progress. Don’t forget to practicing self-compassion. Some days will be easier than others!

We are all learning socially and emotionally every day. #WeAreSEL

Self-Awareness: The Mind-Body Connection

In support of our monthly theme of self-awareness, Meagan Butler, Austin ISD secondary counseling coordinator, shares a brief video to help us build an understanding of how our bodies function and the importance of the mind-body connection. 

Through the video, Meagan describes the role of the vagus nerve and its impact on different areas of the body when we are experiencing different emotions. For example, when we are stressed, we might noticed our stomach feeling upset or our heart rate increase. The Atlas of the Human Body article, shares maps of the body experiencing different emotional experiences. It’s no wonder we would have different bodily sensations with regard to different feelings.

Train Your Brain

Through a few simple practices, you can help your mind understand your emotions and the impact they have on your body.

SIFT
A four step strategy from Dan Siegel called SIFT, encourages you to take a mindful moment to notice your sensations, images, feelings and thoughts related to a particular emotional experience.

BODY SCAN
Doing regular body scan check-ins with yourself throughout the day or during particularly high or low emotional moments are another good way to begin understanding your mind-body connection. Use Meagan’s “Recognizing Body Sensations and Checking in with your Body” checklist to begin your practice.


“Looking deeply requires courage.” –Thich Nhat Hanh

The World of Difference A Breath Can Make

Ultimately, with what we understand about our emotions and the impact they have on the sensations in our body, we can use that information to hack our brains and disrupt negative feelings in our bodies. So, when we are noticing our body react to feelings of stress or nervousness or frustration, we can take a few intentional, deep, slow breaths and introduce a sense of calm back into our bodies. Your vagus nerve will thank you!

Using Morning Meetings to Create a Community for Learners

Ms. Wilson teaches kindergarten at Barbara Jordan Elementary in Austin ISD. Through this video, we take a sneak peek into her classroom during her Morning Meeting class time. This daily ritual provides her students with the opportunity to greet one another, share experiences, build community and more.

Ultimately, Ms. Wilson offers us an excellent example of a practice used to help create a safe, inclusive, culturally responsive, academically engaging and equitable learning environment.